Aqua-Fi: The Internet of Underwater

In this project we implement and deploy Aqua-Fi as a novel underwater system that facilitates internet-connected applications. It is flexible, low cost and low power. The system characteristics involve an uplink data rate of 1.6 Mbps and downlink data rate of 690 Kbps for commands, status correction and overrides, over a distance of 2 meters. Aqua-Fi was first developed using basic LEDs to achieve low cost and simple implementation and then later enhanced to employ bi-directional lasers to facilitate longer coverage and higher link rates.

Underwater Video Communications

The specific scientific objectives of the project are as follows. First, to characterize the statistics of fading in UOWC channels and analyze the corresponding system performance. Second, to develop a novel high speed GaN-based laser diode that can be directly modulated to >2.5GHz, and produces 0.5W optical power, low beam divergence at a single frequency that match the highest transmission wavelength of red sea water. Third, to develop a low-cost, energy-efficient transceiver for UOWC systems supporting high data rate (i.e. up to 1 Gbps and wider transmission coverage up to 1 kilometer). Finally, to build a prototype and perform system testing and debugging to ensure smooth reliable operations in the Red Sea.

What Should 6G Be?

In this project, we propose a human-centric mobile communications application of 6G. Thus, high security, secrecy, and privacy should be key features of 6G and should be given particular attention by the wireless research community. To support this vision, we gave a systematic framework in which potential application scenarios of 6G are anticipated and subdivided. We subsequently define key potential features of 6G and discuss the required communication technologies. We also explore the issues beyond communication technologies that could hamper research and deployment of 6G.

Communication via Breath

In this project, we construct a communication system using inhaled and exhaled breath, where the information is carried in molecules. Constructing such a breath communication system will open the door to a new generation of wireless body networks, he explains. These are the communications systems used by medical practitioners, for example, to wirelessly monitor health using wearable and implanted sensors that can communicate information to a remote device.